OUR SERVICES

Cutting-edge prosthetic techniques and materials, combined with our passion for patient perfection, enable each patient to leave our facility with a strong sense of comfort and security, consistent with their abilities and lifestyle. SCP's services include above knee, below knee, knee disarticulation, and hip disarticulation prosthetics.

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ABOVE KNEE

Designed to give amputees a transfemoral prosthesis that fits intimately and provides increased control and security.

BELOW KNEE

All amputee patients being fitted for transtibial prosthesis are measured for and fit with a prosthetic liner made of medical grade silicone.

KNEE DISARTICULATION

Designed taking into account that the amputee is able to bear weight on the end of their residual limb, increasing their control of the prosthesis.

HIP DISARTICULATION

Resulting prosthesis provides the highest degree of control possible, allowing the wearer to walk with confidence–and sit in comfort!

Services

Above Knee

Transfemoral Prosthesis

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The double-wall NPS socket system is designed to give amputees a transfemoral prosthesis that fits intimately and provides increased control and security. An added benefit is that the comfortable trim lines allow for a larger range of motion.

A silicone liner is rolled onto the residual limb. If the limb is relatively uniform in shape, an “off the shelf” will be used. For those residual limbs with bony prominences, neuromas, etc., a custom liner will be designed. All of our medical grade silicone liners are fabricated on-site in our liner manufacturing lab.

The second component of the system is the prosthetic sock. These socks are layered on top of the liner and act as a wick between the liner and the socket. Socks also accommodate for volume changes within the residual limb.

Next, the inner cup is slid over the prosthetic sock. This is where the SCP system is different than others. A vacuum chamber laminated into the cup will allow even pressure to be distributed over the entire residual limb. A sealing sleeve, which is attached to the inner cup, is then rolled up to seal against the liner.

Lastly, the outer socket (with the knee and foot attached) is placed over the inner cup and the two pieces are locked together with a pin. Air is removed from the socket through a vacuum tube using a pump. This provides the intimate fit that results in the feeling that the prosthesis is a part of you.

 

Below Knee

Transtibial Prosthesis

All amputee patients being fitted for transtibial prosthesis are measured for and fit with a prosthetic liner made of medical grade silicone. These liners are fabricated on-site in our liner manufacturing lab.

The second component of the transtibial prosthesis system is the prosthetic sock. These socks are layered on top of the liner and act as a wick between the liner and the socket. Socks also accommodate for volume changes within the residual limb.

The residual limb is then placed in the socket and air is evacuated. The socket will either contain a vacuum chamber which has been laminated into the socket, or a one-way expulsion valve, depending on the specific needs of the patient (some longer residual limbs do not require elevated vacuum). Lastly, a sealing sleeve is rolled up to seal against the liner above the socket trim lines.

 
 

knee disarticulation

Through knee Prosthesis

The knee disarticulation prosthetic system was designed taking into account that the amputee is able to bear weight on the end of their residual limb, and long length of the limb increases their control of the prosthesis. Therefore, less support is necessary at the top of the socket, allowing for lower trim lines than a traditional transfemoral socket.

All of our knee disarticulate patients are measured for and fit with a prosthetic liner made of medical grade silicone.

The second component of the system is the prosthetic sock. These socks are layered on top of the liner and act as a wick between the liner and the socket and to accommodate for volume changes within the residual limb.

The residual limb is then placed in the socket and air is evacuated through a one-way expulsion valve.

 

Hip Disarticulation

Hemipelvectomy/Transpelvectomy NPS (vacuum) Prosthetic System

SCP’s patented NPS socket system for hip disarticulation amputations was created by Stan Patterson for Sgt. Josh Olsonat the request of Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC). Olson, who lost his leg as the result of an RPG blast in Iraq, wanted to remain in the Army, but the hip disarticulate prosthetic system he was wearing was rigid, bulky, and so uncomfortable that he found it hard to function in. So in 2004, WRAMC sent Josh to POA to create something that would serve him better. Fourteen-hour days and several prototypes produced a low-profile model that was not visible through Olson’s uniform. A custom silicone liner created an effect like a suction cup in a socket that was half the size of previous models. The fit is intimate and secure, preventing the socket movement that beset old versions. Improvements to the liner and socket interface have evolved

since then, but the initial design, named the “Olson socket,” is basically the same.

Overview: Prosthetic Fitting Process for HD/HP/TP Amputees

After a patient is fit with a custom-made medical grade silicone liner (fabricated on-site in our lab) the socket is designed and formed over it, providing a precise and comfortable fit. A light-weight carbon fiber disc containing Negative Pressure Suspension (NPS) technology is inserted into a pocket formed into the silicone liner. Additional components are added and the resulting prosthesis provides the highest degree of control possible, allowing the wearer to walk with confidence–and sit in comfort!

Contact Us 

Southern California Prosthetics

1801 E. Parkcourt Pl., Bldg B
Santa Ana, CA 92701

Tel 949-892-5338

Email info@scprosthetics.com

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